Top 5 Trends for CMOs: Digital Marketing is Just Marketing, New Advantage is Big Data Intelligence

by Lilia Shirman on August 23, 2012

in Marketing

The four CMOs from SAP, Google, DreamWorks, and Intuit at a recent Churchill Club discussion panel were in agreement that social and digital marketing are now standard pieces of the marketing toolset, not distinct areas to be managed separately.    Anne Globe of DreamWorks commented that “social is completely integrated into the fabric of marketing.”  A sentiment echoed by Nora Denzel of Intuit, who said, “There is no such thing as digital marketing – it’s all integrated together.”

Taking it a step farther and reinforcing the previously discussed trend that the product IS the marketing, Nora added that Intuit is integrating social into the product itself by providing access to user forums and peer support directly from the product.  DreamWorks is also leveraging social within the product by integrating movies with games, which Anne described as “the coolest newest way to engage viewers.”

Now that digital marketing has permeated go-to-market activity, what technologies will marketers adopt next to add some bleeding-edge luster?  Seems the answer is the same as for everything else in tech these days:  intelligence drawn from big data. Nora Denzel believes that “social media, smart mobile devices, and [intelligence gleaned from big] data will create a real market of one.”    Intuit is already looking at ways to combine transactional, behavioral and social user-generated data to better serve customers.  The company already offers new customer value by aggregating data across tens of thousands of businesses to create an employment and revenue index for small businesses.

Though Intuit’s service is free, Laura McLellan of Gartner pointed out that Marketing can use its new intelligence to help identify new revenue sources.   Lorraine Twohill, VP of Global Marketing at Google, sees this as a great opportunity for marketing. “If you own the insights function, you are the oracle and sage and that’s a great role that marketing can play.”

Of course the bleeding edge has its name for a reason. It can be a risky place to walk.   Lorraine pointed out that companies must balance customers’ privacy needs against the value that big data offers.  That’s likely to be a challenge for years to come.  Ultimately, the technologies available to marketers will evolve in ways we can’t predict.  Anne Gardner described the implications:  “Technology helps us get to where our customers are.  But we have to keep our plan open so that we can leverage new technologies that we can’t foresee yet.”

Is you company using data about customers or product usage to provide extra value to customers?

Be Sociable, Share!

Previous post:

Next post: