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Collaboration

Amid meeting quarterly numbers, executing strategic programs, and dealing with day-to-day minutia, it’s helpful to occasionally pause, look at the big picture, consider long-term objectives, update strategies, and make plans.

That pause often takes the shape of a management off-site.  (I’m calling it an off-site even when held in a large conference room on site.)  An effective one will produce alignment on strategy, clear and measurable objectives, and specific action plans.  A bad one will simply waste time.

I’ve seen as many of the latter as the former, and have created this handy list for how to waste decision-makers’ time while leaving the organization to continue on whatever path it was already meandering down.

  1. Everyone is extremely busy, so don’t bother participants with prep materials before the meeting. They won’t read them anyway.
  2. People who need to present information can bring it to the meeting.  They are all experienced professionals so there is no need to review their content ahead of time or provide guidance. They know what level of detail is appropriate for this audience.
  3. The decisions you intend to make will impact the entire company.  Make sure as many people as possible are there to participate and contribute to the discussion and the decision-making.  The more the merrier.
  4. When disagreement arises, chose one of the following options. a.) Let the debate go on until it’s time for lunch; you can catch up during that flexible ½ hour you built into the agenda in the afternoon.  b)  Shut down the discussion as quickly as possible. The issue is too big to address in the meeting, so will have to get worked out later.
  5. Use the breaks to catch up on email and voicemail.  You’re spending the entire day talking to the other participants, so why bother checking in with them during the breaks?  If anyone has a concern or opinion they haven’t yet voiced, they will tell you eventually.
  6. People always take notes during these meetings, so you can rely on them to keep track when an action item comes up that they own.
  7. It’s a long meeting, so when you get back to your desk, dive into the work that got delayed while you were at the meeting.  You can tell people what happened and about any decisions that got made when you run into them in the coffee room.

Please share your own suggestions for how to hold completely useless planning meetings!

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“We’re not in control. The Customer is.”
– Lorraine Twohill, VP Global Marketing, Google

We’ve talked here in our blog and in my book about the concept of collaborating with customers as the means to engage the more empowered buyer.  The mindset that customers have greater control than ever was clearly evident among the CMOs on a recent Churchill Club panel.

When asked whether his organization was “marketing-led,” “engineering-led,” or “sales-led,” Jonathan Becher, CMO at SAP, answered, “There’s only one kind of “led” – customer led.”  He described that at the last SAP conference, the decision about which topics to include was “crowd sourced from the customer.”

Nora Denzel,  Senior VP, Big Data, Social Design and Marketing at Intuit provided more examples of how Intuit is sharing the reigns with its customers: Intuit’s CEO meets with customers each quarter before speaking to his staff at the ops reviews.   Intuit has “outsourced product management and marketing to the customer.”  That’s because Intuit’s new product features get exposed to customer in a web sand-box, and their viability is determined based on actual customer usage.  Anne Globe of DreamWorks agreed that today there’s an opportunity for the customer to “take you in a different direction than what you planned” when you designed your marketing campaign.

Bottom Line:  2.0 didn’t just change the technologies we use to communicate, collaborate, and sell.  It has completely transformed customer mindsets.  Buyers in both B2B and B2C markets expect greater corporate transparency and increased influence over what is sold to them, where and how.  They also exercise greater collective and individual power in the marketplace.  Companies that can redefine their customer relationships from one of buyer-seller to that of a team collaborating to discover, learn, design solutions, and maximize their usefulness will command greater loyalty.

 

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Giving employees motivating purpose

by Lilia Shirman on June 15, 2010

in People and Leadership

In a previous post, I noted that traditional sales rewards may be insufficient to inspire stellar performance in the complex task of enterprise sales.  I suggested that companies evaluate and increase the autonomy, mastery, and purpose – all critical to high performance on complex tasks – that their sales reps have.

My suggestions on increasing purpose related to the company and its customers.  I’m happy to report that Matt Bertuzzi has responded to my request to share alternative sales incentives and practices.

Here is a thought-provoking interview by Matt with Linda Flanagan, COO of Green Leads, on creating purpose through external social and philanthropic programs.

Of course, many companies engage in philanthropic giving and projects. What I love about this idea is how directly the employees are involved.

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CIO Agenda Recap

by Lilia Shirman on May 11, 2009

in Technology industry

At the Churchill Club CIO Agenda event last Thursday, Peter Solvik (formerly CIO at Cisco) led a discussion among a powerhouse of IT leadership:  Matt Carey, CIO of Home Depot (former CTO, eBay and Wal-Mart), Karenann Terrell, CIO of Baxter (formerly CIO at Daimler / Chrysler), and Lars Rabbe, former CIO at Intuit and YahooTopics included SaaS, Clouds, the good an bad of vendor consolidation, and the uptake of Web 2.0 and collaboration technologies.

Here’s a summary of their views and my takeaways on these top-of-mind IT themes:

Q: What are you focusing on over the next year?

All three CIOs are managing costs more actively, but key strategic projects are still very much under way.  Baxter is doing a massive new ERP deployment, and Home Depot is continuing its supply chain upgrade.  Home Depot’s CFO says that right now, “cash is king,” so the company has stopped construction of multiple new stores (while competitors are continuing to build at a faster rate,  and cut costs in IT and operations.

Takeaways:

There are two ways to sell in this environment. 1. Show concrete cost savings and a short time to realize them.  2. Find out what your prospects’ one big initiative is, and show how you add value to it.

Q: Consolidation – Good or bad? Giving vendors too much power?

Here the CIOs disagreed. Lars felt consolidation helps ease integration, though of course too much consolidation eliminates alternatives. Overall, he felt he’d benefited from consolidation as a CIO. Matt agreed that better integration was a positive, but is concerned that vendors may gain too much power in negotiating contract renewals and maintenance fees.

Karenann, on the other hand, believes that the benefits of integration are limited, that it moves slowly, and that it “has not unraveled the complexity.” Even worse, while everyone is busy with integration, there is a pause in innovation. Karenann also voiced a concern about unjustified support and maintenance costs: “I’m willing to pay an annuity, but only if I get extra value.”

Takeaways:

  • Complexity is still a challenge, so both big and small vendors that can help reduce it can do well.
  • If your competitors are buy digesting acquisitions, take advantage of innovation as a differentiator
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