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The fifth trend that emerged from Churchill Club’s recent Chief Marketing Officer Agenda 2013 event was the expansion and diversification of the marketing role and skillset.  Several new, or newly important, areas of responsibility are driving the need for new skills:

  • Marketing organizations are aligning more closely with sales objectives.  The four speakers from SAP, Intuit, Google, and DreamWorks all mentioned revenue as a key marketing metric.  Nora Denzel, Senior VP, big data, social design and marketing at Intuit, said her company considers its marketers to be “growth officers.”
  • Marketers are often the customer advocates in the company.  At Google, Marketers not only evangelize the company externally, but also “play a big role internally in evangelizing on behalf of the customer,” according to Lorraine Twohill, VP global marketing there.
  • Marketers are also increasingly responsible for customer experience and engagement.  Lorraine Twohill mentioned that one of her organization’s main responsibilities is to “make technology mean something to real people in their daily lives.”   The focus on customer experience also translates into marketing having greater involvement earlier in the product design process.   DreamWorks CMO Anne Globe describes integrating movies with games as a way to engage viewers – a tactic that erases the lines between product development and marketing.  (See previous post: The Product IS the Sales and Marketing.)

These roles obviously extend well beyond marketing’s traditional purview of awareness and lead generation campaigns.  Google’s marketing organization now includes coders, artists, analysts, and gamers.   According to Lorraine Twohill, Google likes to hire marketers who don’t see the old functional limits, but can imagine completely novel ways of engaging customers.  When Nora Denzel was asked about hiring, she echoed the sentiment:  “We want a diversity of skills and backgrounds, and people who can do multiple tracks.”

Bottom Line: Consider what role your marketing team can play to provide the greatest value to your company and customers, and what new types of customer engagement are emerging in your industry.   Then

  • Identify the skills your team will need in its future role.
  • As you outsource leading edge techniques and tactics to 3rd parties, pay attention to which specialists and skillsets they have on the team.
  • Consider hiring people who have an in-depth understanding of your customer, but from a very different perspective and background than the existing team.
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The four CMOs from SAP, Google, DreamWorks, and Intuit at a recent Churchill Club discussion panel were in agreement that social and digital marketing are now standard pieces of the marketing toolset, not distinct areas to be managed separately.    Anne Globe of DreamWorks commented that “social is completely integrated into the fabric of marketing.”  A sentiment echoed by Nora Denzel of Intuit, who said, “There is no such thing as digital marketing – it’s all integrated together.”

Taking it a step farther and reinforcing the previously discussed trend that the product IS the marketing, Nora added that Intuit is integrating social into the product itself by providing access to user forums and peer support directly from the product.  DreamWorks is also leveraging social within the product by integrating movies with games, which Anne described as “the coolest newest way to engage viewers.”

Now that digital marketing has permeated go-to-market activity, what technologies will marketers adopt next to add some bleeding-edge luster?  Seems the answer is the same as for everything else in tech these days:  intelligence drawn from big data. Nora Denzel believes that “social media, smart mobile devices, and [intelligence gleaned from big] data will create a real market of one.”    Intuit is already looking at ways to combine transactional, behavioral and social user-generated data to better serve customers.  The company already offers new customer value by aggregating data across tens of thousands of businesses to create an employment and revenue index for small businesses.

Though Intuit’s service is free, Laura McLellan of Gartner pointed out that Marketing can use its new intelligence to help identify new revenue sources.   Lorraine Twohill, VP of Global Marketing at Google, sees this as a great opportunity for marketing. “If you own the insights function, you are the oracle and sage and that’s a great role that marketing can play.”

Of course the bleeding edge has its name for a reason. It can be a risky place to walk.   Lorraine pointed out that companies must balance customers’ privacy needs against the value that big data offers.  That’s likely to be a challenge for years to come.  Ultimately, the technologies available to marketers will evolve in ways we can’t predict.  Anne Gardner described the implications:  “Technology helps us get to where our customers are.  But we have to keep our plan open so that we can leverage new technologies that we can’t foresee yet.”

Is you company using data about customers or product usage to provide extra value to customers?

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In 42 Rules for Growing Enterprise Revenue, I talk about the fact that customer relevance is a corporate skillset, not a departmental one.  Creating a positive, customer-relevant experience involves many parts of the organization, and the speakers at the recent Churchill Club CMO panel provided lots of validation and great examples of why shared ownership is critical.

Nora Denzel, Senior VP of Big Data, Social Design and Marketing at Intuit commented that Intuit’s CIO, sales, and marketing all contribute to create the customer experience.  Lorraine Twohill, VP of Global Marketing  at Google agreed that cross-functional collaboration is critical because while Marketing focuses on customer acquisition, keeping customers and making them happy is what sales, support, and IT (in a SaaS company) do.   Jonathan Becher, CMO at SAP, summed it up well.  “The SAP experience is about the company, it’s not a marketing thing. If it were, no one would pay attention,” he commented.

Bottom Line: Consider making great customer experience an objective for every organization that impacts it.

  • Ask each functional team to identify specifically how they affect customer experience.
  • Set detailed objectives in your annual and quarterly plans for how they can improve the department’s contribution to a great customer experience.
  • Identify opportunities for cross-functional initiatives to offer new value to customers. It’s these that often have the greatest impact.

Please share how different parts of your company are collaborating to serve customers better.

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Top 5 Trends for CMOs

by Lilia Shirman on August 9, 2012

in Customer relationships,Marketing

Last week I had the opportunity to attend a panel discussion with some of Silicon Valley’s top CMOs:  Jonathan Becher, CMO at SAP, Nora Denzel, Senior VP, Big Data, Social Design and Marketing at Intuit, Anne Globe, CMO at DreamWorks Animation, and Lorraine Twohill, VP Global Marketing , Google.   The moderator was Laura McLellan of Gartner.

Some interesting themes emerged from the discussion.  Here, and in subsequent posts, I’ll summarize the CMOs’ comments and add some perspective about the implications for marketers and their companies.

The top 5 trends:

  1. Customer Power
  2. Shared ownership for Customer Experience
  3. The Product IS the Marketing
  4. Social and Digital Marketing disappearing as distinct disciplines, Big Data key new tool
  5. The expanding Marketing skillset
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